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For Healthy Pets

Over 150 articles on companion animal health written by authorities including Dr. Jeff Feinman, a qualified vet and leading veterinary homeopath.

In these entertaining and informative pet health articles, Dr. Jeff and quest writers cover important pet health areas.
Thursday, 15 December 2011 01:26

What to Expect When You Adopt a Pet from a Shelter

Written by Petfinder
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I encourage everyone to adopt their next pet. It is wonderful to save the life of a dog or cat.

Adopted pets usually make wonderful companions and truly appreciate their new "forever" homes. Unfortunately, some adoption agencies can make the process very difficult. If you've encountered this situation, I encourage you to try one of the Petfinder links below. Here's what Sue Sternberg has to say about this:

 

Bill of Rights for Adopters

  • You have the right to adopt the best dog/cat you have ever met
  • You have the right to adopt a dog or cat that has not bitten and broken skin on a human
  • You have the right to adopt a dog that will be safe with passing children in the neighborhood
  • You have the right to adopt a dog that has not killed another dog
  • You have the right not to be blamed if the dog you adopt turns out aggressive
  • You have the right not to be blamed for NOT adopting a dog that has been at the shelter for too long/ to choose not to adopt a dog and not to be made to feel guilty because the dog has been sheltered long-term
  • You have the right not to be pressured to adopt an incompatible or dog you don't readily connect with because/even though the alternative is euthanasia
  • You have the right to be educated, and explained the reasons why you are refused and adoption, so that you can make changes in order to become a conscientious pet owner
  • You have the right to be treated with respect, courtesy, and professionalism
  • You have the right to inquire and receive as much prior behavioral and medical history on the dog that is currently available
  • You have the right to be informed of the dogs actual age, and if the actual age is not known, to receive the best guess from a shelter professional
  • You have the right to be informed of the dogs actual breed or breed mix, and if not known, to receive the best guess from a shelter professional, with no euphemisms or avoiding breeds that conjure up public fear (e.g. Pit Bull, Chow, etc.)
  • You have the right to expect the shelter to stand behind its dogs/puppies, and accept them back AT ANY TIME, for ANY REASON, should the need ever arise in the dog's lifetime

You can search for cats to adopt (and learn about the breeds) here:

 

You can also learn about dog breeds and help a homeless dog here:

Read 6673 times Last modified on Sunday, 22 January 2012 15:25
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